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Life Insurance at Various Life Stages

Your need for life insurance changes as your life changes.
 
When you’re young, you typically have less need for life insurance, but that changes as you take on more responsibility and your family grows. Then, as your responsibilities once again begin to diminish, your need for life insurance may decrease. Let’s look at how your life insurance needs change throughout your lifetime.
 
Footloose and fancy-free
 
As a young adult, you become more independent and self-sufficient. You no longer depend on others for your financial well-being. But in most cases, your death would still not create a financial hardship for others. For most young singles, life insurance is not a priority.
Some would argue that you should buy life insurance now, while you’re healthy and the rates are low. This may be a valid argument if you are at a high risk for developing a medical condition (such as diabetes) later in life. But you should also consider the earnings you could realize by investing the money now instead of spending it on insurance premiums.
If you have a mortgage or other loans that are jointly held with a cosigner, your death would leave the cosigner responsible for the entire debt. You might consider purchasing enough life insurance to cover these debts in the event of your death. Funeral expenses are also a concern for young singles, but it is typically not advisable to purchase a life insurance policy just for this purpose, unless paying for your funeral would burden your parents or whomever would be responsible for funeral expenses. Instead, consider investing the money you would have spent on life insurance premiums.
 
Your life insurance needs increase significantly if you are supporting a parent or grandparent, or if you have a child before marriage. In these situations, life insurance could provide continued support for your dependent(s) if you were to die.
 
Going to the chapel
 
Married couples without children typically still have little need for life insurance. If both spouses contribute equally to household finances and do not yet own a home, the death of one spouse will usually not be financially catastrophic for the other.
 
Once you buy a house, the situation begins to change. Even if both spouses have well-paying jobs, the burden of a mortgage may be more than the surviving spouse can afford on a single income. Credit card debt and other debts can contribute to the financial strain.
To make sure either spouse could carry on financially after the death of the other, both of you should probably purchase a modest amount of life insurance. At a minimum, it will provide peace of mind knowing that both you and your spouse are protected.
 
Again, your life insurance needs increase significantly if you are caring for an aging parent, or if you have children before marriage. Life insurance becomes extremely important in these situations, because these dependents must be provided for in the event of your death.
 
Your growing family
 
When you have young children, your life insurance needs reach a climax. In most situations, life insurance for both parents is appropriate.
Single-income families are completely dependent on the income of the breadwinner. If he or she dies without life insurance, the consequences could be disastrous. The death of the stay-at-home spouse would necessitate costly day-care and housekeeping expenses. Both spouses should carry enough life insurance to cover the lost income or the economic value of lost services that would result from their deaths.
Dual-income families need life insurance, too. If one spouse dies, it is unlikely that the surviving spouse will be able to keep up with the household expenses and pay for child care with the remaining income.
 
Moving up the ladder
 
For many people, career advancement means starting a new job with a new company. At some point, you might even decide to be your own boss and start your own business. It’s important to review your life insurance coverage any time you leave an employer.
 
Keep in mind that when you leave your job, your employer-sponsored group life insurance coverage will usually end, so find out if you will be eligible for group coverage through your new employer, or look into purchasing life insurance coverage on your own. You may also have the option of converting your group coverage to an individual policy. This may cost significantly more, but may be wise if you have a pre-existing medical condition that may prevent you from buying life insurance coverage elsewhere.
 
Make sure that the amount of your coverage is up-to-date, as well. The policy you purchased right after you got married might not be adequate anymore, especially if you have kids, a mortgage, and college expenses to consider. Business owners may also have business debt to consider. If your business is not incorporated, your family could be responsible for those bills if you die.
 
Single again
 
If you and your spouse divorce, you’ll have to decide what to do about your life insurance. Divorce raises both beneficiary issues and coverage issues. And if you have children, these issues become even more complex.
 
If you and your spouse have no children, it may be as simple as changing the beneficiary on your policy and adjusting your coverage to reflect your newly single status. However, if you have kids, you’ll want to make sure that they, and not your former spouse, are provided for in the event of your death. This may involve purchasing a new policy if your spouse owns the existing policy, or simply changing the beneficiary from your spouse to your children. The custodial and noncustodial parent will need to work out the details of this complicated situation. If you can’t come to terms, the court will make the decisions for you.
 
Your retirement years
 
Once you retire, and your priorities shift, your life insurance needs may change. If fewer people are depending on you financially, your mortgage and other debts have been repaid, and you have substantial financial assets, you may need less life insurance protection than before. But it’s also possible that your need for life insurance will remain strong even after you retire. For example, the proceeds of a life insurance policy can be used to pay your final expenses or to replace any income lost to your spouse as a result of your death (e.g., from a pension or Social Security). Life insurance can be used to pay estate taxes or leave money to charity.
 
Investment and Insurance Services - Located at NYCB 


Insurance products are offered through LPL Financial or its licensed affiliates, member FINRA / SIPC. New York Community Bank, New York Commercial Bank and Investment and Insurance Services are not registered broker / dealers and are not affiliated with LPL Financial.

Not FDIC Insured ​No Bank Guarantee ​Not a Deposit
​May Go Down In Value ​Not Insured by Any Federal Government Agency

This site is designed for U.S. residents only. The services offered within this section are available exclusively through our U.S. Investment Representatives. LPL Financial's U.S. Investment Representatives may only conduct business with residents of the states for which they are properly registered. Please note that not all of the investments and services mentioned are available in every state.
 

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The Divisions of New York Community Bank

Queens County Savings Bank​

Established on April 14, 1859 in the village of Flushing, Queens County Savings Bank was the first savings bank chartered by the State of New York in the New York City borough of Queens. Until then, local residents would need to travel to Manhattan to do their banking; the opening of the borough’s first local bank was accordingly met with elation and relief.

While the bank expanded here and there over the course of the next 14 decades, its greatest growth occurred in just the last 15 years. In anticipation of expanding its franchise through the first of several mergers, the Bank changed its name to New York Community Bank on November 21, 2000. By the end of that year, NYCB had grown from 14 to 86 branches; today, it has more than 220 branches in five states.

In deference to its heritage as a Queens-based institution, the Community Bank operates each of its 38 branches in the county under its original name, Queens County Savings Bank.

Roslyn Savings Bank

Established in 1875, The Roslyn Savings Bank was the first financial institution headquartered in Nassau County, one of two counties--with Suffolk--that constitute Long Island, New York. Its founders wanted to build a bank that would provide the Island’s residents with a safe place for their savings, as well as the financial assistance they’d need to build or purchase homes.

A member of the NYCB Family of Bank since October 31, 2003, Roslyn Savings Bank today serves the Island’s businesses and consumers through 42 conveniently placed branch offices.

Richmond County Savings Bank

A member of the NYCB Family of Banks since July 31, 2001, Richmond County Savings Bank is the third oldest of our divisions, with roots that go back to October 30, 1886. It was then that the bank was established to serve those who lived and worked on Staten Island, and it was less than one year later that it made its first mortgage loan.

Today, nearly every street on the Island has at least one home that was financed by Richmond County Savings Bank.

Originally located in the Odd Fellows Building at the corner of Richmond Terrace and Broadway, the Bank today has 20 convenient banking locations in all.

Roosevelt Savings Bank

Roosevelt Savings Bank was established in 1895 on the corner of Gates Avenue and Broadway in Brooklyn under the name “Eastern District Savings Bank.” In 1920, the bank changed its name to honor the memory of the nation’s 26th president, Theodore Roosevelt.

In February 1999, Roosevelt Savings Bank merged with and into Roslyn Bancorp, which merged with and into New York Community Bancorp, Inc. in October 2003.  Today, Roosevelt Savings Bank serves its customers through seven branches in Brooklyn as a member of the NYCB Family of Banks.

Garden State Community Bank

Garden State Community Bank has been a member of the NYCB Family of Banks since March 2008, when we combined all the branches of four smaller New Jersey-based divisions--First Savings Bank of New Jersey, Ironbound Bank, Penn Federal Savings Bank, and Synergy Bank—into a single division with a highly relatable name.

While Penn Federal Savings Bank and Synergy Bank were directly acquired in 2007, First Savings Bank of New Jersey and Ironbound Bank were acquired in 1999 by Richmond County Financial Corp., which subsequently merged with NYCB.

By combining the strengths of these four local banks with the strengths of our institution, we established a Garden State community bank that offers more products and services, and more convenient locations, than any one of these banks provided on its own.

Today, we serve our customers through 45 branches in Essex, Hudson, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, and Union Counties, most of which first opened their doors nearly 14 decades ago.

AmTrust Bank

AmTrust Bank is one of the more recent additions to a respected banking family that has been serving customers and communities for more than 156 years.

The first branch of AmTrust Bank opened its doors in the late 1980s, when Ohio Savings Bank opened the first of its branches in south coastal Florida under the “AmTrust Bank” name. Eleven years later, it expanded again--this time to Arizona--and on December 4, 2009, it joined the NYCB Family of Banks. With our acquisition of Desert Hills Bank less than four months later, we further expanded our franchise in the Grand Canyon State.

Currently in its seventh year as an NYCB division, AmTrust Bank serves its customers through 41 convenient branches: 14 in central Arizona and 27 in Florida.

Ohio Savings Bank

Ohio Savings Bank is one of the more recent additions to a respected banking family that has been serving customers and communities for more than 156 years.

Established in 1889 as the Ohio Savings Home Loan and Building Co., the bank’s initial expansion was limited to Ohio until it opened its first Florida branch in 1989. Eleven years later, it expanded again, this time to Arizona. And seven years later, it changed its name to AmTrust Bank.

On December 4, 2009, AmTrust Bank became the newest member of our banking family, the first of our divisions to serve customers in non-contiguous states. Four months later, we elected to pay tribute to its forebear, by operating our 28 branches in Ohio under a more suitable name: Ohio Savings Bank.

To learn about our commercial bank, visit

New York Commercial Bank 


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