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Life Insurance Basics

Life insurance is an agreement between you (the policy owner) and an insurer. Under the terms of a life insurance policy, the insurer promises to pay a certain sum to a person you choose (your beneficiary) upon your death, in exchange for your premium payments. Proper life insurance coverage should provide you with peace of mind, since you know that those you care about will be financially protected after you die.
 
​The many uses of life insurance
 
One of the most common reasons for buying life insurance is to replace the loss of income that would occur in the event of your death. When you die and your paychecks stop, your family may be left with limited resources. Proceeds from a life insurance policy make cash available to support your family almost immediately upon your death. Life insurance is also commonly used to pay any debts that you may leave behind. Life insurance can be used to pay off mortgages, car loans, and credit card debts, leaving other remaining assets intact for your family. Life insurance proceeds can also be used to pay for final expenses and estate taxes. Finally, life insurance can create an estate for your heirs.
 
How much life insurance do you need?
 
Your life insurance needs will depend on a number of factors, including whether you are married, the size of your family, the nature of your financial obligations, your career stage, and your goals. For example, when you are young, you may not have a great need for life insurance. However, as you take on more responsibilities and your family grows, your need for life insurance increases.
 
There are plenty of tools to help you determine how much coverage you should have. Your best resource may be a financial professional. At the most basic level, the amount of life insurance coverage that you need corresponds directly to your answers to these questions:
  • What immediate financial expenses (e.g., debt repayment, funeral expenses) would your family face upon your death?
  • How much of your salary is devoted to current expenses and future needs?
  • How long would your dependents need support if you were to die tomorrow?
  • How much money would you want to leave for special situations upon your death, such as funding your children’s education, gifts to charities, or an inheritance for your children?
Since your needs will change over time, you will need to continually re-evaluate your need for coverage.
 
How much life insurance can you afford?
 
How do you balance the cost of insurance coverage with the amount of coverage that your family needs? Just as several variables determine the amount of coverage that you need, many factors determine the cost of coverage. The type of policy that you choose, the amount of coverage, your age, and your health all play a part. The amount of coverage you can afford is tied to your current and expected future financial situation, as well. A financial professional or insurance agent can be invaluable in helping you select the right insurance plan.
 
What is in a life insurance contract?
A life insurance contract is made up of legal provisions, your application (which identifies who you are and your medical declarations), and a policy specifications page that describes the policy you have selected, including any options and riders that you have purchased in return for an additional premium.
Provisions describe the conditions, rights, and obligations of the parties to the contract (e.g.,
the grace period for payment of premiums, suicide and incontestability clauses).
The policy specifications page describes the amount to be paid upon your death and the amount of premiums required to keep the policy in effect. Also stated are any riders and options added to the standard policy. Some riders include the waiver of premium rider, which allows you to skip premium payments during periods of disability; the guaranteed insurability rider, which permits you to raise the amount of your insurance without a further medical exam; and accidental death benefits.
 
The insurer may add an endorsement to the policy at the time of issue to amend a provision of the standard contract.
 
Types of life insurance policies
The two basic types of life insurance are term life and permanent (cash value) life. Term policies provide life insurance protection for a specific period of time. If you die during the coverage period, your beneficiary receives the policy death benefit. If you live to the end of the term, the policy simply terminates, unless it automatically renews for a new period. Term policies are available for periods of 1 to 30 years or more and may, in some cases, be renewed until you reach age 95. Premium payments may be increasing, as with annually renewable 1-year (period) term, or level (equal) for up to 30-year term periods.
 
Permanent insurance policies provide protection for your entire life, provided you pay the premium to keep the policy in force. Premium payments are greater than necessary to provide the life insurance benefit in the early years of the policy, so that a reserve can be accumulated to make up the shortfall in premiums necessary to provide the insurance in the later years. Should the policy owner discontinue the policy, this reserve, known as the cash value, is returned to the policy owner. Permanent life insurance can be further broken down into the following basic categories:
Whole life: You generally make level (equal) premium payments for life. The death benefit and cash value are predetermined and guaranteed. The policy owner’s only action after purchase of the policy is to pay the fixed premium.
 
Universal life: You may pay premiums at any time, in any amount (subject to certain limits), as long as policy expenses and the cost of insurance coverage are met. The amount of insurance coverage can be decreased, and the cash value will grow at a declared interest rate, which may vary over time.
 
Variable life: As with whole life, you pay a level premium for life. However, the death benefit and cash value fluctuate depending on the performance of investments in what are known as subaccounts. A subaccount is a pool of investor funds professionally managed to pursue a stated investment objective. The policy owner selects the subaccounts in which the cash value should be invested.
 
Universal variable life: A combination of universal and variable life. You may pay premiums at any time, in any amount (subject to limits), as long as policy expenses and the cost of insurance coverage are met. The amount of insurance coverage can be decreased, and the cash value goes up or down based on the performance of investments in the subaccounts
Choosing and changing your beneficiaries
You must name a primary beneficiary to receive the proceeds of your insurance policy. Your beneficiary may be a person, corporation, or other legal entity. You may name multiple beneficiaries and specify what percentage of the net death benefit each is to receive. If you name your minor child as a beneficiary, be sure to designate an adult as the child’s guardian in your will.
 
Generally, you can change your beneficiary at any time. Changing your beneficiary usually requires nothing more than signing a new designation form and sending it to your insurance company. If you have named someone as an irrevocable (permanent) beneficiary, however, you will need that person’s permission to adjust any of the policy’s provisions.
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Insurance products are offered through LPL Financial or its licensed affiliates, member FINRA / SIPC. New York Community Bank, New York Commercial Bank and CFS Investments, Inc. are not registered broker / dealers and are not affiliated with LPL Financial.

Not FDIC Insured ​No Bank Guarantee ​Not a Deposit
​May Go Down In Value ​Not Insured by Any Federal Government Agency

This site is designed for U.S. residents only. The services offered within this section are available exclusively through our U.S. Investment Representatives. LPL Financial's U.S. Investment Representatives may only conduct business with residents of the states for which they are properly registered. Please note that not all of the investments and services mentioned are available in every state.
 

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The Divisions of New York Community Bank

Queens County Savings Bank​

Established on April 14, 1859 in the village of Flushing, Queens County Savings Bank was the first savings bank chartered by the State of New York in the New York City borough of Queens. Until then, local residents would need to travel to Manhattan to do their banking; the opening of the borough’s first local bank was accordingly met with elation and relief.

While the bank expanded here and there over the course of the next 14 decades, its greatest growth occurred in just the last 15 years. In anticipation of expanding its franchise through the first of several mergers, the Bank changed its name to New York Community Bank on November 21, 2000. By the end of that year, NYCB had grown from 14 to 86 branches; today, it has more than 220 branches in five states.

In deference to its heritage as a Queens-based institution, the Community Bank operates each of its 38 branches in the county under its original name, Queens County Savings Bank.

Roslyn Savings Bank

Established in 1875, The Roslyn Savings Bank was the first financial institution headquartered in Nassau County, one of two counties--with Suffolk--that constitute Long Island, New York. Its founders wanted to build a bank that would provide the Island’s residents with a safe place for their savings, as well as the financial assistance they’d need to build or purchase homes.

A member of the NYCB Family of Bank since October 31, 2003, Roslyn Savings Bank today serves the Island’s businesses and consumers through 42 conveniently placed branch offices.

Richmond County Savings Bank

A member of the NYCB Family of Banks since July 31, 2001, Richmond County Savings Bank is the third oldest of our divisions, with roots that go back to October 30, 1886. It was then that the bank was established to serve those who lived and worked on Staten Island, and it was less than one year later that it made its first mortgage loan.

Today, nearly every street on the Island has at least one home that was financed by Richmond County Savings Bank.

Originally located in the Odd Fellows Building at the corner of Richmond Terrace and Broadway, the Bank today has 20 convenient banking locations in all.

Roosevelt Savings Bank

Roosevelt Savings Bank was established in 1895 on the corner of Gates Avenue and Broadway in Brooklyn under the name “Eastern District Savings Bank.” In 1920, the bank changed its name to honor the memory of the nation’s 26th president, Theodore Roosevelt.

In February 1999, Roosevelt Savings Bank merged with and into Roslyn Bancorp, which merged with and into New York Community Bancorp, Inc. in October 2003.  Today, Roosevelt Savings Bank serves its customers through seven branches in Brooklyn as a member of the NYCB Family of Banks.

Garden State Community Bank

Garden State Community Bank has been a member of the NYCB Family of Banks since March 2008, when we combined all the branches of four smaller New Jersey-based divisions--First Savings Bank of New Jersey, Ironbound Bank, Penn Federal Savings Bank, and Synergy Bank—into a single division with a highly relatable name.

While Penn Federal Savings Bank and Synergy Bank were directly acquired in 2007, First Savings Bank of New Jersey and Ironbound Bank were acquired in 1999 by Richmond County Financial Corp., which subsequently merged with NYCB.

By combining the strengths of these four local banks with the strengths of our institution, we established a Garden State community bank that offers more products and services, and more convenient locations, than any one of these banks provided on its own.

Today, we serve our customers through 45 branches in Essex, Hudson, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, and Union Counties, most of which first opened their doors nearly 14 decades ago.

AmTrust Bank

AmTrust Bank is one of the more recent additions to a respected banking family that has been serving customers and communities for more than 156 years.

The first branch of AmTrust Bank opened its doors in the late 1980s, when Ohio Savings Bank opened the first of its branches in south coastal Florida under the “AmTrust Bank” name. Eleven years later, it expanded again--this time to Arizona--and on December 4, 2009, it joined the NYCB Family of Banks. With our acquisition of Desert Hills Bank less than four months later, we further expanded our franchise in the Grand Canyon State.

Currently in its seventh year as an NYCB division, AmTrust Bank serves its customers through 41 convenient branches: 14 in central Arizona and 27 in Florida.

Ohio Savings Bank

Ohio Savings Bank is one of the more recent additions to a respected banking family that has been serving customers and communities for more than 156 years.

Established in 1889 as the Ohio Savings Home Loan and Building Co., the bank’s initial expansion was limited to Ohio until it opened its first Florida branch in 1989. Eleven years later, it expanded again, this time to Arizona. And seven years later, it changed its name to AmTrust Bank.

On December 4, 2009, AmTrust Bank became the newest member of our banking family, the first of our divisions to serve customers in non-contiguous states. Four months later, we elected to pay tribute to its forebear, by operating our 28 branches in Ohio under a more suitable name: Ohio Savings Bank.

To learn about our commercial bank, visit

New York Commercial Bank 


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